Sport History

Badminton was invented long ago; its origins date back at least two thousand years to the game of battledore and shuttlecock played in ancient Greece, India and China. Badminton took its name from Badminton House in Gloucestershire, the home of the Duke of Beaufort, where the sport was played in the last century. By coincidence, Gloucestershire is now the base for the International Badminton Federation. Badminton was first played in Canada, in Ottawa, in 1900. It first appeared in the Olympics as a demonstration sport in 1972 and became a full medal sport at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona.

Badminton is the world’s fastest racquet sport. The flight of the shuttlecock, a missile of cork and goose feather that players volley across the net, has been recorded at speeds of 332 kilometres per hour. Speed, agility and lightning-fast reflexes are essential to the game. Add stamina too—players have been known to cover more than six kilometres in a single match.

Badminton was part of the very first Canada Winter Games in Quebec City.


Each province/territory will have five male athletes and five female athletes. To be eligible, athletes must be under the age of 23 in order to compete in the Games.


There will be Team and Individual competitions. 

For both the Team and Individual competitions, each match will be played in a best 2 out of 3 format in order to determine the winner. The match will be conducted under the Rally Point system as approved by the Badminton World Federation in May 2006 and as subsequently adopted by Badminton Canada in June 2006. 

Notable Alumni

  • Anna Rice
  • Darryl Yung
  • Charmaine Reid
  • Mike Beres
  • Denyse Julien
  • Robbyn Hermitage
  • Bryan Moody
  • Michelle Li
  • Phyllis Chan

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